Contents

Supplementary benefits

Temporary Additional Support and Special Benefit

Temporary Additional Support

Costs covered

Temporary Additional Support is used as a last resort. It is used to help a client meet living costs that:

This assistance is available to cover essential and unavoidable ongoing regular costs. These costs may include:

– for employment reasons, or
– because of disability in the family
– costs are not met through the Disability Allowance, or
– clients or their families are not eligible for the Disability Allowance.

Some of the above items have limits on the number of items that can be purchased using Temporary Additional Support and on the payment amounts made under that programme.

This assistance is available for a maximum of 13 weeks, but it may be approved for a shorter period. Clients with an ongoing deficiency of income may reapply after receiving it for 13 weeks.

Temporary Additional Support was introduced from 1 April 2006.

Eligibility

To receive Temporary Additional Support, clients must:

Special BenefitTop

Before 1 April 2006, a Special Benefit could be paid to people receiving a main benefit and to other low-income earners. To receive one, a client had to have:

From 1 April 2006, Temporary Additional Support replaced Special Benefit for new applicants. Any Special Benefit paid after this date either:

Numbers receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special BenefitTop

The number receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit decreased slightly between 2010 and 2012

This decrease (see table TS.1) followed increases between 2008 and 2010. This pattern largely reflected changes in the number of clients receiving a main benefit.

table TS.1: Numbers receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit

  Clients receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit1,2
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Total receiving assistance 42,514 58,016 63,910 61,028 60,211

Notes

  1. The number of clients recorded in SWIFTT as receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit at the end of June.
  2. Special Benefits shown are restricted to ongoing (weekly) Special Benefits, and exclude Special Benefits paid as lump sums.

The number of clients granted Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit remained relatively flat between 2009/2010 and 2011/2012

This pattern (see table TS.2) largely reflected the changes in grants of main benefits outlined earlier.

table TS.2: Numbers granted Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit

  Clients granted Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit1,2
2007/2008 2008/2009 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012
Total granted assistance 117,276 201,384 266,012 269,514 273,689

Notes

  1. The number of successful applications for Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit recorded in SWIFTT during years ended June.
  2. The information on Special Benefits shown is restricted to ongoing (weekly) Special Benefits, and excludes Special Benefits paid as lump sums.

Since its implementation in 2006, Temporary Additional Support has become the main form of ongoing hardship assistance paid

Eighty-eight percent of clients receiving ongoing hardship assistance in 2012 were receiving Temporary Additional Support. This compared with 83% in 2010. As time passes since the implementation of Temporary Additional Support, fewer clients are eligible to receive a Special Benefit.

Virtually all of the ongoing hardship assistance granted since 2006 has been Temporary Additional Support

This reflected the restricted eligibility for a Special Benefit from 1 April 2006.

Relatively small numbers of people aged 18 or over were receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit

Between 2009 and 2012, around 1.8% of people aged 18 or over were receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit. Those aged 25–64 were slightly more likely than younger or older people to be receiving this assistance.

This reflected the ages of the recipients of Domestic Purposes Benefits, Sickness Benefits and Invalid’s Benefits, who are the main recipients of Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit.

More information about clients receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit

Two in five clients receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit were receiving a Sickness Benefit or an Invalid’s Benefit

Between 2009 and 2012, 39% of the clients receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit were receiving a Sickness Benefit or an Invalid’s Benefit (see table TS.3). Another 36% were receiving a Domestic Purposes Benefit.

table TS.3: Financial assistance paid to clients receiving Temporary Additional Support or
a Special Benefit

Financial assistance paid at the end of June Clients receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit1,2
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Unemployment Benefits 1,575 6,669 8,031 7,661 7,035
Domestic Purposes Benefits 17,181 21,387 23,565 21,889 21,201
Sickness Benefits 7,311 10,451 12,156 11,767 12,249
Invalid’s Benefit 11,283 12,339 12,569 12,149 12,069
Other main benefits3 1,646 2,126 2,080 2,034 1,938
New Zealand Superannuation or
Veteran’s Pension
1,527 2,133 2,519 2,646 2,921
None of the above assistance4 1,991 2,911 2,990 2,882 2,798
Total 42,514 58,016 63,910 61,028 60,211

Notes

  1. The number of clients recorded in SWIFTT as receiving Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit at the end of June.
  2. Special Benefits shown are restricted to ongoing (weekly) Special Benefits, and exclude Special Benefits paid as lump sums.
  3. Comprises Unemployment Benefit – Training, Unemployment Benefit – Hardship – Training, Unemployment Benefit – Student Hardship, Independent Youth Benefit, Widow’s Benefit and Emergency Benefit.
  4. Includes clients receiving other supplementary benefits, and clients entitled to Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit through receiving an Unsupported Child’s Benefit or an Orphan’s Benefit.

One in three grants were to clients receiving Domestic Purposes Benefits

Between 2009/2010 and 2011/2012, 33% of the clients granted this assistance were receiving a Domestic Purposes Benefit (see table TS.4). Another 21% were receiving Sickness Benefits, while 17% were receiving Unemployment Benefits.

table TS.4: Financial assistance paid to clients granted Temporary Additional Support or
a Special Benefit

Financial assistance paid when Temporary Additional Support or Special Benefit granted Clients granted Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit1,2
2007/2008 2008/2009 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012
Unemployment Benefits 10,066 26,502 47,178 46,401 44,227
Domestic Purposes Benefits 42,071 70,125 88,436 89,121 89,113
Sickness Benefits 28,135 44,139 56,669 57,219 59,224
Invalid’s Benefit 17,498 27,863 33,228 34,952 37,372
Other main benefits3 5,665 9,417 11,223 11,955 12,895
New Zealand Superannuation or
Veteran’s Pension
3,058 6,496 8,908 10,099 11,452
None of the above assistance4 10,783 16,842 20,370 19,767 19,406
Total 117,276 201,384 266,012 269,514 273,689

Notes

  1. The number of successful applications for Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit recorded in SWIFTT during years ended June.
  2. The information on Special Benefits shown is restricted to ongoing (weekly) Special Benefits, and excludes Special Benefits paid as lump sums.
  3. Comprises Unemployment Benefit – Training, Unemployment Benefit – Hardship – Training, Unemployment Benefit – Student Hardship, Independent Youth Benefit, Widow’s Benefit and Emergency Benefit.
  4. Includes clients receiving other supplementary benefits, and clients entitled to Temporary Additional Support or a Special Benefit through receiving an Unsupported Child’s Benefit or an Orphan’s Benefit.